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IPC Training –FAQ

How long does IPC certification take?

Course length depends on which course you are taking.

Here are the lengths of the classes, including CIS (operator) and CIT (trainer):

  • IPC-A-610 CIS: 3 days for full certification; 1.5 days for recertification
  • IPC-A-610 CIT: 4 days for full (all modules) certification; 1.5 days for recertification
  • J-STD-001 CIS: 5 days for full certification; 2 days for recert
  • J-STD-001 CIT: 5 days for full (all modules) certification; 2 days for recert
  • IPC-A-620 CIS: 3 days for full certification; 1.5 days for recertification
  • IPC-A-620 CIT: 4 days for full (all modules) certification; 1.5 days for recert
  • 7711/7721 CIS: 5, 10-hour days for full certification; 2, 8-hour days for recertification
  • 7711/7721 CIT: 5, 8-hour days for full (all modules) certification; 2, 8-hour days for recertification
  • IPC-A-600 CIS: 2 - 3 days for full certification; 1 - 1.5 days for recertification
  • IPC-A-600 CIT: 3 days for full (all modules) certification; 1.5 - 2 days for recertification
How do I become an IPC trainer?

The IPC "trainer" level or CIT requires certification from a master training center like BEST. If the a student successfully completes the instruction the person will be granted a 2 year transferable certification in order to certify other technician-level (CIS) candidates.

What does "IPC" stand for?

"IPC" is the "Association Connecting Electronics Industries." This industry-based non profit provides internationally-accepted standards for the electronics and associated manufacturing industries.

How do I become re-certified as an instructor?

The IPC CIT trainer level certifications require re-certification every 2 years. This can be accomplished with a simple challenge test or a complete re-certification class. The re-certification is a "review" of the materials and is recommended to those who may not have been teaching the material very frequently or are not comfortable with their skills. A "challenge" re-certification is designed for those who instruct ALL of the time or who have been certified for many years and are VERY knowledgeable with the material.

What is the difference between Class 2 and Class 3 products? How is the training different?

Class 2 products require continued performance and extended life, with uninterrupted service being desirable but not critical. Examples of such products include computers, industrial automation equipment, and process controls. Class 3 products demand continued high performance or require performance on-demand, both being critical, with equipment downtime that cannot be tolerated. The end use environment may be uncommonly harsh and the equipment must function when required. Some examples of Class 3 products are found in life support systems, aeronautical devices, and in certain military applications.

When training at the CIS and CIT levels, IPC certification is no different for the different Classes of products. At BEST, we always welcome questions on the specific Classes of products you may be working on or training others on. BEST instructors will take extended questions on the standards offline or after class if they feel that the overall class may not benefit from such a detailed discussion on a specific class.